27 February 2011

Farewell to the Duke of Flatbush



It's a sad day for the Dodgers family as we've lost one of the greatest sluggers to ever don the uniform. A man with no shortage of nicknames - the Silver Fox, the Duke of Flatbush - Edwin Donald Snider has died at 84.

The greatest Dodgers center fielder in history, Duke Snider was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980. His #4 is up there with Robinson's #42 and Koufax' #32 as the stuff of Dodger royalty. I'll always remember the Duke as the tender, misunderstood, larger-than-life giant from Roger Kahn's The Boys of Summer.

Who better to send off the Duke than Vin Scully, who provided the official Dodgers statement:

“He was an extremely gifted talent and his defensive abilities were often overlooked because of playing in a small ballpark, Ebbets Field. When he had a chance to run and move defensively, he had the grace and the abilities of DiMaggio and Mays and of course, he was a World Series hero that will forever be remembered in the borough of Brooklyn. Although it’s ironic to say it, we have lost a giant. He’s joining a great Dodger team that has moved on and I extend my sympathies to his entire family, especially to Bev.”
Farewell, Duke Snider. Have fun patrolling the great center field in the sky

24 February 2011

Spring Break!


Our spring break is in the dead of winter. Naturally. Remember to check the starting pitching preview. Bullpen will be up soon.

22 February 2011

So far, so good

Vin Scully is My Homeboy put up this pic of the new Dodgers magazine cover. Now I wouldn't usually endorse this kind of propaganda, but I have to say I'm very pleased with how Donnie Baseball is doing so far.

Unlike his predecessor, Mattingly is saying all the right things when they need to be said. He started Spring Training with the announcement that Clayton Kershaw will be the opening day starter (not that Torre wouldn't have, but having Jon Garland on the roster would have made the decision difficult), he's given straight answers to reporters' questions (very anti-Ned), and he hasn't named Eugenio Velez as his cleanup hitter (yet). Donnie has surrounded himself with some good Dodger names on his coaching staff (Hansen, Wallach, and Lopes), as well as put his focus on getting the guys as ready as they can fundamentally. As you likely remember, the team was painfully sloppy last year and Torre sat on his hands all summer to watch.

So... so far, so good, Donnie. Let's just remember how many mound visits we get per inning.

UPDATE -

"I know everybody talks about [James Loney's] power, but he has been right around 90 RBI every year," Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. "Last year, he was on pace to drive in 115-120. He had 63 at the break, and it just went bad. Nobody would even be talking about home runs if he had driven in 115 runs. ... I think this guy has it in him, I really do.


Oh for Christ's sake, Don.


Pitching preview is coming.

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Now playing: Buena Vista Social Club - Chan Chan
via FoxyTunes

21 February 2011

2011 Preview - The Starting Pitchers



Before I begin, I'd like to update you on my life. I applied to a bunch of schools for my Master's and will likely submit a few more applications soon enough, but I've turned my concentration toward Teach For America, an organization I really think fits me and what I where I want to go with my life.

I assume the TFA folks would only need to Google my name and to happen upon this blog. If you're reading this now, TFA Admissions Officer, please do not assume that I am as bitter and resentful about most things as I am the Dodgers and Frank McCourt. After all, today I'm going to talk about starting pitching and how pleased I am with what we've got going into 2011.

Also, TFA Admissions Officer, I didn't deactivate my Facebook to hide from you. I decided to do a Facebook-Free February before I even applied. And so far it's been good, three weeks in and I have yet to feel withdrawals. I'm also the most productive than I've ever been, reading and writing like a roadrunner. I keep going back and forth whether I want to reactivate my profile on March 1. I guess since my birthday is March 13 and I may want to hang out with people, it might be a useful tool. It'll be a game-time decision.

Now, onto the rotation...

Even with the sudden (and "shoulda' saw that coming") injury to Vicente Padilla, the Dodgers Starting 5 is intact. Having Padilla as the emergency sixth starter was a nice little gift going into Spring Training but now we're one Rotator Cuff injury away from Carlos Monasterios or John Ely hopping into the rotation (and Jeff Weaver getting a roster spot).

All we can do now is cross our fingers and hope the rest of spring training will go off without a hitch.

The Dodgers rotation may not have the star power of the ludicrously good Phillies Phront Phive (need to copyright that) or the upside of the stellar young Giants squad that just carried the team to the World Series, but it's likely one of the top 5 in the National League. I'd take Kershaw, Billingsley, Kuroda, Lilly, and Garland, all capable of putting up 200 innings and keeping an ERA under 4.50, over all others aside from the Phillies, Giants, and maybe the Brewers & Braves (note that the Cards just lost Adam Wainwright today and Tommy John surgery looks to be on the horizon).

Pitching doesn't look to be a huge issue for the team this season, nor does it ever seem to be. Whether its because of underrated pitching coaches, desirable pitching conditions at Dodger Stadium, or Stan Conte's special supply of "vitamins," Dodger pitching has been stellar the past few seasons. At the end of 2010, while the offense was dawdling around like a bunch of losers, the Dodger rotation was unreal.

Clayton Kershaw
The ace. It's been a while since the Dodgers had a guy you were truly excited to see every 5th day. Last year, Kershaw became that pitcher. He went 200 innings for the first time in his career, lowered his WHIP and (hugely important) dropped his walk rate while increasing his strikeouts. He finished 2010 with an ERA+ of 132. Considering 100 is an "average" pitcher (Garland, pitching in Petco Park last year, was at 106), its safe to finally label the golden boy as a bona fide ace. Losing him would be a huge loss, but the rest of the staff could potentially pick up the slack if he were to be out a month or so. Longer than that and they'd be in big trouble.

Chad Billingsley
After an epic second half collapse in 2009 that saw his biggest critics attack his toughness, Billingsley shot back in 2010 with a solid performance that saw him up his K's and drop his BB's. Chad needs to regain the form that made him the Dodgers' best pitcher in 2008 (and second best just behind Brad Penny in 2007 when Bills was only 22). Billingsley's ceiling for 2011 is for him to be the Matt Cain sidekick to Kershaw's Tim Lincecum. It would be a huge disappointment to see him end up more like 2009 Bills, but 2010 looks to have been a good omen and another 130 ERA+ season like '07 and '08 wouldn't be out of the question. If he starts out of the gate as Bad Chad though, the Boo Birds and critics who question his ability to man up will start getting louder and louder.

Hiroki Kuroda
Although 2011 will only be Kuroda's fourth in the majors, he's been pitching professional ball since 1997 when he was a freshly caught 22-year old making his debut with the Hiroshima Carp (see what I did there?) of the Japanese Central League. Kuroda is the only guy on the staff I wouldn't deem a for-sure innings eater, as he has made three DL trips in his three seasons (though none last year), and he certainly comes with the most risk of injury out of all the Dodgers starters because of his history. He's been very good in Dodger blue though, and since you can't put a price on very good, his $12 million salary this year could be seen as a solid move if he does end up on the mound the entire year and continues on his track of delivering above-average pitching. His MLB career ERA is 3.60, he strikes out 3 times as many batters as he walks, and 2010 was his best season as a Dodger, so expecting Kuroda to be an above-average #3 starter is certainly reasonable. Health is the key think for the superHiro.

Ted Lilly
Ted Lilly came over to LA in one of Colletti's awful deadline trades last year. He rejoined the team that first drafted him and pitched very well, striking out 5 times as many batters as he walked. Unfortunately, he could have pitched like Walter Johnson and the team still would have ended up 40 games back, or however we ended up last season. Lilly's Achilles Heel has always been the home run and one would hope that he would be able to take advantage of the big outfields in the NL West to keep his fly balls in the park during the three years he signed to be a Dodger. Lilly has only put up one poor season (2005 in Toronto) since becoming a regular rotation fixture, and is a two-time All-Star as well as extremely efficient with his strikeouts and walks. He is a well above-average #4 starter and will certainly hop on up to #3 in 2012 after Hiroki Kuroda returns to Japan. I'm excited for Lilly and think it wouldn't be out of the question for the top 4 guys in the rotation to really lead this team to victory. They're not Halladay, Lee, Oswalt, and Hamels, but they don't need to be in this division.

Jon Garland
I was shocked when Ned Colletti signed Garland. How could this be the same GM that confidently journeyed into 2010 with Charlie Haeger the Horrible as his 5th starter? I was expecting to go back into this season with another fifth starter capable of getting zero outs before getting pulled in the first inning (I was at that game and Ramon Ortiz pitched 5 innings of mediocre relief that encouraged Torre to keep him around for far longer than he deserved). Garland, though, is coming off a solid year near the top of a Padres staff that almost dragged a historically bad offense into the postseason. A true innings eater, Garland has pitched at least 190 innings in each of the last nine seasons. His best season was in 2005 when he and Mark Buehrle pitched the White Sox to a World Championship. Those days are certainly behind him, but as a fifth starter in another relatively large ballpark (Garland, like Lilly, is a notorious fly ball pitcher - averaging 1.9 per 9 innings in his career), he should be just fine.

As I mentioned earlier, Vicente Padilla won't be the Dodgers' #6 starter until probably the All-Star Break. Non-roster pitchers in camp include Rubby De La Rosa (L.A.'s 2010 Minor League pitcher of the year who still needs some time on the grill), Dana Eveland (who has pitched for five teams and was never good anywhere), Tim Redding (see Dana Eveland), and Oscar Villareal (not as bad as the previous two but still not good). Other options include Albuquerque vet Javy Guerra, Jon Link, Ely, and Monasterios. Guerra has trouble finding the mitt and Link (as well as Scott Elbert and Blake Hawksworth) appears to be fighting for a bullpen spot. That leaves Ely and Monasterios, who both saw time in L.A. in 2010.

John Ely and Elymania roared through the Southland for about a month before he fell back to Earth, escaping from Chavez Ravine with an ERA just below 5.50. Whether it was wear, the other hitters figuring him out, or any other reason, the lively righty lost his mojo and became extremely hittable. All we can do is hope that the Ely of May 2010 who couldn't throw a base on balls will return and the Ely of June and beyond disappears into memory.

Carlos Monasterios, on the other hand, stuck with the team the entire reason for no reason other than the fact that he had to. As a Rule 5 pick, he needed to stay on the 25-man roster all season or else he would have been returned to the Phillies, the team from which the Dodgers claimed him. The young Venezuelan pitched well enough, especially out of the bullpen, but never seemed dominant, often scooting out of trouble rather luckily.

Monasterios and Ely will likely head the rotation in Albuquerque going into 2011, but I think the role of emergency sixth starter goes to the one who is the hotter hand at the moment of opportunity. With the starting five Colletti has somehow managed to put together, I'm confident we can at least contend in the division. It'll be up to the offense to take it from there.

Roster

Lineup
C - Rod Barajas
1b - James Loney
2b - Juan Uribe
3b - Casey Blake
SS - Rafael Furcal
LF - Jay Gibbons
CF - Matt Kemp
RF - Andre Ethier

Bench
C - Dioner Navarro
OF - Tony Gwynn Jr.
OF - Marcus Thames
IF - Ivan De Jesus
UT - Jamey Caroll

SP - Clayton Kershaw
SP - Chad Billingsley
SP - Hiroki Kuroda
SP - Ted Lilly
SP - Jon Garland

RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -

Next, the bullpen.

17 February 2011

2011 Preview - The Outfield

In the name of expediency, let's tackle the entire outfield today and move on to the pitching staff with our next post.

It doesn't seem so long ago that 2/3 of the Dodgers outfield were Silver Slugger winners and the third part was Manny Ramirez.

But Andre Ethier and Matt Kemp both struggled in 2010, Kemp with accusations of a lack of passion, Ethier with a nagging finger injury that derailed what looked to be a magical year.

But 2011 is a new year. Kemp's biggest critics - Joe Torre, Larry Bowa, and Bob Schaeffer - are all history. He's broken off his relationship with pop star Rihanna, meaning we can all stop pretending that was what was distracting him. And with Donnie Baseball and Davey Lopes offering a new approach to managing the budding star, it looks like Kemp enters this season with an unobstructed path toward finally breaking into the echelon of baseball's elite players. Whether or not he makes it there appears to be all up to him.

Ethier also comes in to Spring Training hoping to return to a previous glory. He was the best hitter in the major leagues for the first two months of the year before a broken pinkie finger landed him on the disabled list. When he returned, Ethier's swing still looked hindered and his stats plummeted until the final stretch, where he managed to end on a high note. Despite his struggles, 2010 was still a productive year for Ethier, marking the fifth of five season in the majors where his OPS was above .800. Compare that to Dodger stars such as Steve Garvey, whose career began with five straight sub-.800 OPS seasons, or Eric Karros, who only had three such seasons ever. Ethier is as close to a sure thing in the middle of the order the Dodgers have had since Sheffield or Piazza. We only wonder what may have been if he hadn't gotten hurt taking extra hacks in batting practice last season. Ethier will either stabilize as a decent middle-of-the-order bat or continue the upward pace he was on before his injury.

Whether or not we get the Kemp and Ethier of '09, they're the foundation the team is built upon. As I wrote in the last post, their performances, along with the health of Rafael Furcal, are going to be what make or break this team.

The 2010 season also saw the Dodgers' left field situation downgrade from sure-thing Manny Ramirez to a gaping black hole. We may remember 2010 as the year Ned's love affair with awful washed-up vets came back to bite him, Messieurs Anderson and Podsednik being the poster-boys. Scotty Pods, evidently confident that his atrocious play down the stretch would be rewarded, turned down a $2 million option to come back to L.A. this year. The gamble didn't quite pay off, as he just signed a minor league deal with Toronto.

The rest of the season we saw a revolving door of outfielders try and make an impact in the lineup. Jay Gibbons was a pleasant surprise. Trent Oeltjen was unspectacular but managed to get on base. Mostly absent was Xavier Paul, whose few chances to make an impact at the major league level have been plagued by injury and being lower than Garret Anderson on the depth chart.

Paul is out of options and one would hope he could get a shot to make the big club before Colletti ships him off to Pittsburgh or Tampa Bay, but it looks like his fate is sealed. When Ned wasn't signing random right-handed relievers, he was picking up crappy outfielders. Oeltjen is back on a minor league deal. Gibbons is back on a major league deal and is expected to begin the season as the starter. More on him in a bit.

Former Giant Eugenio Velez is getting an invite to Spring Training and will be wearing the number 9 (shows how much anyone really cares about Russ Mitchell, I guess). All you need to know is that the Giants non-tendered Velez even though he wasn't arbitration eligible. That means he wasn't getting a raise and they could have paid him chump-change (if you can call $400,000 chump change) and they still got rid of him. Ned... it's because he sucks.

Gabe Kapler is also getting a trip to Camelback Ranch this spring. Colletti loves guys like Kapler who once did something good (hit for the cycle), have some sort of "gamer" personality (retired to manage in the minors but came back to play in the majors again), and aren't particularly good (hit .210 and .239 the past two years in TB). If anything he'll be the star in Albuquerque this summer and hope for Ethier to break another finger because Colletti would most certainly turn to someone with experience over someone with tangible skill.

Speaking of tangible skill, Tony Gwynn Jr. doesn't have any. The epitome of Major League nepotism, Gwynn got a major league contract this offseason, meaning he'll be the main backup to Kemp in center. He does play a good defensive center, but the hitting prowess that put his father in the hall of fame hasn't quite trickled down to Tony Jr. Like Kapler, he hit .210 last season and was so unimpressive that even the team that canonized his pops, the Padres, sent him on his way. While he's certainly no Eugenio Velez, Gwynn is fairly similar (if not inferior) to Xavier Paul. He's not costing much more though, so perhaps it all comes out in the wash. The word on the playground is that Gwynn will see playing time in CF with Kemp moving to a much more comfortable RF and Ethier shifting to LF. If Gwynn manages to hit well enough (he won't), Colletti would like that arrangement best.

Also coming to Spring Training (and wearing #62 and #63) are Trayvon Robinson and Jamie Hoffmann. Robinson is still at least a few months away from being able to make an impact on the major league club but Hoffmann, who you may remember from a brief stint with the Dodgers in '09 (and for being the #1 pick in the Rule 5 draft last year before being returned to L.A.), should be able to compete for some playing time. If Joe Torre were still manager, he'd automatically be lower than Kapler and Velez on the depth chart. Since we have to give Mattingly the benefit of the doubt, we can assume that Hoffmann, who plays a sparkling outfield and has shown glimpses of batting skill, will be given a fair shake.

The final piece of Colletti's puzzle is Marcus Thames, last year's Yankees DH who slugged .491 and has hit 50 homers in the past three seasons with New York and Detroit. While his bat is his best asset, Thames is laughably bad in the outfield and can only fit in otherwise at first base. Regardless, he looks to be Gibbons' (another scare on defense) platoon partner for the time being, netting starts against lefties.

As for Gibbons, watching him make it back to the majors and do well was a real pleasure. As he was the guy who replaced Garret Anderson, Gibbons could have played like a 12-year old and he still would have been an improvement. I think Gibbons, like catcher Rod Barajas, is probably being overrated because of one hot month in a Dodger uniform. I don't have much confidence in his ability to maintain a starting job, but I'm open to being surprised.

Colletti has to have his fingers crossed that this left-fielder by committee thing won't blow up in his face. I questioned his priorities a few months ago when he was handing out a three year deal to a 7th-inning reliever while there was still a gaping hole in the outfield. The situation reeks of the bumbling GM simply putting a Hello Kitty band-aid on a massive, bleeding wound. It wouldn't surprise me to see this get real ugly before it gets any better.

Still, if Kemp and Ethier manage to excel (or if they completely bomb), it won't really matter who plays Curly in their group of stooges.

Spring Training Predictions
Kemp - Starter CF
Ethier - Starter RF
Gibbons - Starter LF
Thames - Backup LF
Gwynn - Backup CF
Paul - Traded
Hoffmann - AAA
Robinson - AA or AAA
Oeltjen - AAA or released
Velez - AAA or released
Kapler - AAA or released

Predicted 25-Man so far:

Lineup
C - Rod Barajas
1b - James Loney
2b - Juan Uribe
3b - Casey Blake
SS - Rafael Furcal
LF - Jay Gibbons
CF - Matt Kemp
RF - Andre Ethier

Bench
C - Dioner Navarro
OF - Tony Gwynn Jr.
OF - Marcus Thames
IF - Ivan De Jesus
UT - Jamey Caroll

SP -
SP -
SP -
SP -
SP -

RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -

Tomorrow - the starting staff.



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Now playing: Elliott Smith - Coming Up Roses
via FoxyTunes

2011 Preview - Left Side of the Infield

Three weeks later and I'm still alive. Pitchers and catchers (and Andre Ethier) have reported to Spring Training and I'm not done with this preview yet. The show must go on though, especially because I have so much to say about the abortion that is left field.

But first, the rest of the infield.

There aren't any big surprises as to who will be positioned to opening day starter Clayton Kershaw's right (or, since he'll probably end up pitching out of the stretch a lot, behind him). Barring any spring training injuries, Rafael Furcal will be the shortstop and Casey Blake will man the hot corner.

Furcal enters the final year of his second 3-year deal with the Dodgers. It will be his 12th season in the bigs but, as you may remember, Furcal was a young phenom (though not nearly as young as they thought he was) with the Braves, winning the Rookie of the Year award in 2000. As we Dodgers fans are aware, the Rookie of the Year award is no real indicator that a player will be a star, but Raffi has put together a fine career that, despite some time missed due to a bad back, has been absolutely solid.

The 2010 season was Furcal's best (if you can call 97 games a full season) and a big improvement over a slightly disappointing 2009 campaign. Furcal's slugging percentage was the best of his career (aside from the 36 game tear he went on in 2008 before missing almost the entire rest of the season to injury) and his speed returned, his SB count rising from 12 to 22 and his CS count falling from 6 to 4. Despite more nagging injuries, Furcal was an All-Star in Anaheim and made an impact late in the game by doing his best first-baseman impersonation on a throw from Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd. Naturally, it bailed Jonathan Broxton out before he could cough up another 9th inning lead.

Furcal has been a delightful staple for this Dodgers team the past 5 years. His defense has always been brilliant, he has improved his ability to get on base, and he is a dynamic lead-off man capable of doing all the little things baseball purists love lead-off men to do. And since he's only 33 (ish), I can imagine that the team would love to reward him with another deal if he can prove he is resilient enough to play 140 games. Hell, if he plays like he did before getting hurt in 2008, the Dodgers might even take on the $12 million option for a 4th year on his current contract.

Unfortunately for Furcal and the Dodgers, the likelihood of that happening is doubtful (seriously - McCourt pay anyone not his lawyer or his son 12 million bucks?), but you have to hope for it because Furcal is likely the most vital cog in the machine behind Ethier and Kemp. If those three - Furcal and the two outfielders - struggle in 2011, this team is going nowhere.

Jamey Carroll is likely Furcal's main back-up, as he was last year. Carroll proved that he is a serviceable replacement who can get on base and make things happen. Because there are so many question marks in the middle of the infield, I think Ivan DeJesus Jr. has a good chance of making the team as an extra infielder. It would not be a stretch to assume that there could be a situation where the middle infield is made up of not Uribe and Furcal but rather Carroll and DeJesus.

If Furcal can't prove himself to be worthy of an extension, the Dodgers could go into 2012 with Uribe at shortstop and look for a new second basemen. Another hope would be that either DeJesus or Justin Sellers, whom we'll see in spring training, will have a solid 2011 perhaps be able to compete for the starting job. Then there's also Dee Gordon, one of the team's top 3 prospects who could possibly be ready in 2012, though he still needs some work getting some muscle on his body to be able to contend with the big boys.

---

Casey "Beardus Christ" Blake, when not having his shtick stolen by Brian Wilson, also enters 2011 in the final year of a 3-year deal. Unlike Furcal, I don't think there's much chance of seeing Blake in Dodger Blue after 2011. This is Blake's age 37 year. His age 36 year saw his production plummet, his OPS falling a whopping 105 points (832 to 727) from his solid 2009 to his underwhelming 2010. In 2009, Blake was one of the most valuable players on the team, a third baseman with power and a decent glove. Last year he was just another average body at the hot corner.

It's easy to blame age for his decline, but Blake had the best season of his career in 2009 at 35. Another resurgence is possible and, even though his stats were meager in comparison to what one would hope for from the hot corner, Blake was still statistically the best third baseman in the division last year.

In all likelihood though, we're watching Blake devolve from a solid big league third baseman to perhaps only a decent regular or even part-time player. Part of the argument for signing Uribe was the fact that he can easily patch up a hole if one were to appear at the hot corner. The Loney-Carroll-Furcal-Uribe infield could be popular if Blake gets hurt or struggles. Beard can also spell Loney at first base. He and Gibbons will see time as the backup.

There has also been talk of sticking Blake in left field from time to time. Since the team appears committed to having Uribe's bat in the lineup, sticking Blake in left field would allow Uribe to play the position he defends the best and gets Carroll's OBP in the batting order. There will certainly be some situations where I would much rather see Jamey Carroll in the lineup than any of the clowns in the revolving door at left field.

That I just typed the previous sentence really serves as a testament to how screwed we are.

When Colletti signed Blake a few years ago, top prospect Josh Bell became expendable. He became the Orioles' big catch in the George Sherrill trade. Baltimore just traded for former D'backs dual home run and strikeout machine Mark Reynolds, so perhaps Bell is on his way to becoming Andy La Roche version 2.0. Either way, we don't have anyone lined up to take Blake's spot in 2012 (unless, of course, we just stick Uribe there).

Our best case scenario in 2012 probably doesn't include Blake, so I hope he manages to have a decent season and ends up with a nice final deal somewhere. I think the ideal scenario in 2012 would be to have Uribe at third, Furcal at short on a two-year deal, and one of the Gordon, Sellers, DeJesus trio at second base. In all likelihood, we'll probably see Ned make a boneheaded free agent pickup (or two).

The early list of 2012 free agents up the middle include such obvious Ned signings as Jose Lopez ("we like what he could possibly do with the bat... in a vacuum"), Jack Wilson ("Who wouldn't want another Jamey Carroll?"), Adam Kennedy ("he's a grade-A gamer who once touched David Eckstein"), and Yuniesky Betancourt ("We just hate our team"). Also, does it shock anyone else that Ned has never signed Alex Gonzalez or Orlando Cabrera? Those guys are the kinds of washed up journeymen our GM salivates over.

Is it too early to look forward to 2013?

Predicted 25-Man so far:

Lineup
C - Rod Barajas
1b - James Loney
2b - Juan Uribe
3b - Casey Blake
SS - Rafael Furcal
LF - Jay Gibbons
CF -
RF -

Bench
C - Dioner Navarro
OF -
OF -
IF - Ivan De Jesus
UT - Jamey Caroll

SP -
SP -
SP -
SP -
SP -

RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -
RP -



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Now playing: The Clash - Rock The Casbah
via FoxyTunes